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Thread: Plant Badges

  1. #1
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    Plant Badges

    I was just pondering the idea of what are some good alternative plant badges for those of us in other areas of the world than Europe, and the U.K.? Since many of us do not have direct access to the European badges. What are some good alternatives both for plants similar to traditional plant badges, and for others which will look nice.

    I'll start by saying I know that boxwood is a plant badge which is traditional, and available in the Rocky Mountains of North America.

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    Generally speaking I believe it is possible to purchase faux plant badges-- you might try one of your local craft stores-- I have a sprig of holly that I bought for about a buck or two several years ago from Moskatells in Los Angeles.

  3. #3
    Semiomniscient is offline Membership voided at member request
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordanjm View Post
    I was just pondering the idea of what are some good alternative plant badges for those of us in other areas of the world than Europe, and the U.K.? Since many of us do not have direct access to the European badges. What are some good alternatives both for plants similar to traditional plant badges, and for others which will look nice.

    I'll start by saying I know that boxwood is a plant badge which is traditional, and available in the Rocky Mountains of North America.
    I'm pretty sure that blueberry will suffice for bilberry in the Buchanan plant badge.

    I am also curious how to preserve real plant badges. I've heard such things as dipping flowers in wax to preserve them, will this carry true for plant badges?

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    I don't know if every clan offers one, but my wife got a metal plant badge frpm her clan society;

    Order of the Dandelion, The Houston Area Kilt Society, Bald Rabble in Kilts, Kilted Texas Rabble Rousers, The Flatcap Confederation, Kilted Playtron Group.
    "If you’re going to talk the talk, you’ve got to walk the walk"

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    I'd say if you can't obtain a real or silk version of the clan plant badge, and you really want something stuck in your cap, then a silk version of your state flower, which for Utah is the Sego lily

    would work just fine. Barring that, a silk dandelion looks really nice.

    By the way, florist shops are a good source for silk flowers.
    --dbh

    When given a choice, most people will choose.

  6. #6
    Semiomniscient is offline Membership voided at member request
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    Quote Originally Posted by piperdbh View Post
    I'd say if you can't obtain a real or silk version of the clan plant badge, and you really want something stuck in your cap, then a silk version of your state flower, which for Utah is the Sego lily

    would work just fine. Barring that, a silk dandelion looks really nice.

    By the way, florist shops are a good source for silk flowers.
    HAHA! I'm in Louisiana and I'd look like some kind of goober with a big ole' magnolia stuck in my bonnet. But for those whose state flowers are of reasonable size, I think this is a great idea, especially if you are in your state's tartan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Semiomniscient View Post
    HAHA! I'm in Louisiana and I'd look like some kind of goober with a big ole' magnolia stuck in my bonnet.
    Does it actually specify grandiflora, or will any ol' magnolia do?

    I think you could pull it off, but you may not want to.
    Ken Sallenger - apprentice kiltmaker, journeyman curmudgeon

  8. #8
    Semiomniscient is offline Membership voided at member request
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    Quote Originally Posted by fluter View Post
    Does it actually specify grandiflora, or will any ol' magnolia do?

    I think you could pull it off, but you may not want to.
    I only know of one magnolia that is the state flower and it's big... so yeah... and actually I don't think it'd even be possible considering the stem would likely bend, tear, or break my cockade or the badge. :-)

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    MacBean is offline Oops, it seems this member needs to update their email address
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordanjm View Post
    I'll start by saying I know that boxwood is a plant badge which is traditional, and available in the Rocky Mountains of North America.
    Boxwood is available in many east coast gardens and parks. However, this one puzzles me, as I thought Clan Chattan generally used whortleberry, a heath. True, that web pages do mention boxwood first for MacGillivray. The two plants do look vaguely related, but are actually unrelated and distinct. The heaths often have edible berries while boxwood is seriously toxic throughout and smells like cat piss, but makes a great hedge, though susceptible to diseases.

    There are lots of whortleberry relatives commonly available in many regions, including blueberry, cranberry, lingonberry, and barberry, or even bearberry (kinikinik) and dozens of other low-to middle growing, small woody plants with round edible berries with small evergreen leaves.

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    MacBean is offline Oops, it seems this member needs to update their email address
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    er, forgot, whortleberries look live the picture in my avatar.

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