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  1. #11
    Join Date
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    The next thing to do is start to dissassemble the kilt.

    Here I have un-stitched the liner and folded it back. I was careful not to damage the liner as I feel this is a special kilt and would like to re-use it.



    The interfacing in this kilt is made of a cotton canvas not the hair canvas we use today. I see this often in kilts made in the UK.

    After 60 years this interfacing is in remarkably good shape. You can see in this photo that while the interfacing is reletivavely intact some of the stitching has broken and come loose. This accounts for the looseness that allowed the distortion of the aprons.
    One small detail I found at this stage is a length of bias tape sewn around the strap hole. This is just one small thing and would not have taken much time or effort but is just one of the pieces of evidence that this kilt was made with care.




    the only thing I see that is different from a well made kilt of today is the width of the interfacing. You can see that it is only about 2 1/2" wide where today we install interfacings which are 6"-7" wide, or as wide as the Fell is tall..
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    21st March 11
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    Interesting... Looks like the interfacing does double duty here - canvas and stabilizer.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    I've now removed the interfacing and exposed the stabilizer.



    Just as with the interfacing there is evidence that some of the stitching has failed over the years. Along with the stitching of the interfacing failing the stitching of the stabilizer failing is the reason that the fabric is distorted by the stresses put on this kilt.

    The stitch failure allowed the kilt to stretch but not enough to cause the stitching of the pleats to be stressed and fail.

    Here is a close up of the stabilizer after I cut it loose.



    You can see that even though some of the stitches holding the stabilizer failed they still held enough that the stabilizer took up the load as it is intended to. You can see in this close-up photo that the fabric has been pulled so much that it too has started to fail.

    I can conclude that the failure of the cotton thread used to stitch the interfacing allowed the folds in it to expand causing the distortion of the aprons.
    The failure of the stitching of the stabilizer has held enough that the stresses have not be transferred to the pleats so this kilt held together.

    Remember that the interfacing, stabilizer and the stitching holding them are made of a cotton so more than likely this detereoration of the stitching and fabric is due to sweat. After 60 years even cotton will begin to rot and weaken.

    The stabilizer is relativly as narrow as the interfacing was. This could have contributed to their starting to fail. But they lasted 60 years so maybe being this narrow is not as bad a thing as it would appear compared to what we use today.

    Another thing I would like to point out is something you can see in the top photo of this post. Just to the right of the strap hole you can see a small white piece of canvas that is sewn in to reinforce the strap hole. Another small detail but another piece that I often find missing in modern traditional kilts.
    Last edited by The Wizard of BC; 28th March 12 at 12:13 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  4. #14
    M. A. C. Newsome is offline
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    Contributing Tartan Historian
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    Steve,

    I somehow missed the fact that you are now the official kiltmaker for the Canadian Scottish Regiment. Congrats!

  5. #15
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by M. A. C. Newsome View Post
    Steve,

    I somehow missed the fact that you are now the official kiltmaker for the Canadian Scottish Regiment. Congrats!
    I missed it too, until this thread. Pretty cool!
    - Justitia et fortitudo invincibilia sunt
    - An t'arm breac dearg

  6. #16
    Join Date
    18th December 11
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    One quick question. Is that the Stewart Hunting tartan? Sure does look like it.
    proud U.S. Navy vet

    Creag ab Sgairbh

  7. #17
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    Yes, the Canadian Scottish Regt. wear the Hunting Stewart Tartan.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    3rd January 08
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    Steve, what a great visual journey into the inner workings of how a kilt is put together. The fact that this kilt has held up so well for 60 years is amazing, and speaks to the skill of the original maker. Now that you are restoring it to its glory it should be able to last another 60 years until someone else might get a chance to see your skills!
    His Exalted Highness Duke Standard the Pertinacious of Chalmondley by St Peasoup
    Member Order of the Dandelion
    Per Electum - Non consanguinitam

  9. #19
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
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    Dorset, on the South coast of England
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    I was just reflecting that that kilt was probably being worn at about the time of my first birthday.

    Also, that there are very few other types of garment which - though obviously having had considerable wear - would firstly come through in such good condition and secondly could be disassembled non distructively and be rebuilt with new underpinning.

    The kilt is a very environmentally friendly item of clothing.

    Anne the Pleater :ootd:

  10. #20
    Join Date
    21st December 05
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    Hawick, Scotland
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    Steve,

    I somehow missed the fact that you are now the official kiltmaker for the Canadian Scottish Regiment. Congrats!
    I missed it too, until this thread. Pretty cool!
    Ditto.
    Congratulations Steve.
    Vice-President and Regional Director for Scotland for Clan Cunningham International, and a Scottish Armiger.

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