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  1. #21
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    What a fantastic, educating and intriguing thread! Thanks Steve!

    Cheers,

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    We have been getting kilts here at the shop for repair. Some are old and some pretty recent. All of these kilts have suffered far more abuse than what a kilt would normally go through. They are worn in rain, mud, on parade and in the field. They are issued to new troops with very little knowledge of how to care for a kilt and because they are issued the troops have little concern in taking care of them.
    Comparing the pics of the 12 year old kilt vs. the 60 year old kilt its obvious the older one was owned by someone who knew how to take care of it and respected it.

    But the younger one looks like the neighbors dogs played tug of war with it. I was under the impression that kilts were no longer used as battle dress, so why would they be worn in the field? I would think you would have to purposly abuse a kilt in order to get it in that kind of shape.

    As expensive as this piece of kit can be, you would think they would be better taken care of. BDU's (or whatever they call them these days) is the uniform to abuse and replace cheaply.

  3. #23
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    Heathbar,

    I really don't think the issue here is the difference in care or abuse. I currently have 11 kilts in for repair. There are three of these 60 year old kilts and the rest are newer ones.
    All the newer ones are in tatters. All the older kilts just need minor stuff like new straps or new waistbands. None of the old kilts has experienced the drastic failure of the Fell stitching that you see in the first photo of this thread.

    I'm convinced in looking at these kilts that it is in the small details of the construction. Those little extras that were done on the old kilts that is missing in the newer ones.

    That is what this thread is all about. I'm trying to answer the question "What about the construction of these older kilts is allowing them to survive while the newer ones fail?"
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    Heathbar,

    I really don't think the issue here is the difference in care or abuse. I currently have 11 kilts in for repair. There are three of these 60 year old kilts and the rest are newer ones.
    All the newer ones are in tatters. All the older kilts just need minor stuff like new straps or new waistbands. None of the old kilts has experienced the drastic failure of the Fell stitching that you see in the first photo of this thread.

    I'm convinced in looking at these kilts that it is in the small details of the construction. Those little extras that were done on the old kilts that is missing in the newer ones.

    That is what this thread is all about. I'm trying to answer the question "What about the construction of these older kilts is allowing them to survive while the newer ones fail?"
    So its down to construction. Could it also be the quality of the materials used? Is the tartan itself "weaker" than it was 50 years ago? As others, I look forward to your progress.

  5. #25
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    HeathBar,

    While the fabric used in the older kilts is different than that used in the newer kilts, I don't think I would say it was stronger. Later today I'll put away what I'm working on the do a side by side photo of the different fabrics.

    I can tell you that while different, both ages of fabric have held up pretty well. On none of these kilts do you see a failure of the fabric itself. Yes, there are some holes and tears due to a kilt pin getting caught on something, or a rip somewhere. The fabric itself is, for the most part intact.

    It really does seem to be in the internal construction details.

    These kilts are really making me look closely at my own product. I think that it would be the highest honor to have someone replace the straps on one of my kilts 60 years from now and wonder what I did to make it last so long.
    Last edited by The Wizard of BC; 29th March 12 at 11:21 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  6. #26
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    Because of this thread I went and read the original. Very fasinating, I missed the first altogether. Please keep it coming. I just aquired a very old kilt that is in need of repair and this is just the ticket. As others have said ... Great thread. This is why I continue to return to this site.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by okiwen View Post
    Because of this thread I went and read the original. Very fasinating, I missed the first altogether. Please keep it coming. I just aquired a very old kilt that is in need of repair and this is just the ticket. As others have said ... Great thread. This is why I continue to return to this site.
    ***

  8. #28
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    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post

    I am now the Regimental Kiltmaker to the Canadian Scottish Regiment.


    Well congratulations! And the regiment has certainly got the right man for the job, one who really knows what he's doing and who takes the time and care to do things right.

    BTW I find it interesting that the kilts of The Canadian Scottish are pleated to alternate between two different stripes. IIRC the kilts of the Cape Breton Highlanders are like that too. I don't think any of the Scottish military kilts are like that, so is it a Canadian thing? Makes me wonder about Australian etc military kilts.

    Also, it's interesting that that kilt was made in 1952 at Thomas Gordon & Son. We here in the USA have a venerable kiltmaker who travels about the country teaching kiltmaking classes, Elsie Scott Stuehmayer, who began her five-year kiltmaking apprenticeship with Thomas Gordon & Son in 1949. So, that kilt may well have been made by her!
    Last edited by OC Richard; 10th June 12 at 05:13 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  9. #29
    Join Date
    13th March 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    BTW I find it interesting that the kilts of The Canadian Scottish are pleated to alternate between two different stripes. IIRC the kilts of the Cape Breton Highlanders are like that too. I don't think any of the Scottish military kilts are like that, so is it a Canadian thing? Makes me wonder about Australian etc military kilts.

    Also, it's interesting that that kilt was made in 1952 at Thomas Gordon & Son. We here in the USA have a venerable kiltmaker who travels about the country teaching kiltmaking classes, Elsie Scott Stuehmayer, who began her five-year kiltmaking apprenticeship with Thomas Gordon & Son in 1949. So, that kilt may well have been made by her!
    Richard, I can't give you any reason why the pleating is to the alternate stripe, but they call it "ketchup and mustard". You never know, I might have worn that kilt back in the early seventies!
    "Touch not the cat bot a glove."

  10. #30
    Mr.Charles Anthony is offline Membership Revoked for repeated rule violations.
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    Steve;Rabble;
    The Interfacing in the Antique Kilt is 'cotton'? By the photo it looks to be a rough linnen? Is this interfacing what someone called 'sail-cloth'?
    And what fabrick is the lining?
    A great photo project - and a 'do it right' hint to kiltmakers!
    As Ever
    CSA

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