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  1. #1
    Join Date
    27th July 12
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    Central Coast, New South Wales, Australia
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    X-kilt for Multiday Trekking/Hiking

    I have three 90km (60mi) and one 260 km (160mi) thru-hikes (north of Sydney) planned before the end of April and I’m toying with the idea of wearing a utility kilt but it feels over-engineered for my needs (perfectly good for other things), and there is more than a few rub points with my backpack. I am pondering whether one of Alan Hebert’s X-Kilts would fit the bill. The idea of making one and using it for these four hikes carries a lot of appeal.

    Does anyone have experience with wearing them during multiday treks? Any suggestions on tweaks or hacks to make X-kilts more trek-worthy would be welcome?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    21st October 13
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    Stevenage Herts, UK (& Turku, Finland)
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    Plug for the Elkommando

    Quote Originally Posted by scabd View Post
    I have three 90km (60mi) and one 260 km (160mi) thru-hikes (north of Sydney) planned before the end of April and I’m toying with the idea of wearing a utility kilt but it feels over-engineered for my needs (perfectly good for other things), and there is more than a few rub points with my backpack. I am pondering whether one of Alan Hebert’s X-Kilts would fit the bill. The idea of making one and using it for these four hikes carries a lot of appeal.

    Does anyone have experience with wearing them during multiday treks? Any suggestions on tweaks or hacks to make X-kilts more trek-worthy would be welcome?
    Since the end of April is only a couple of days away or so, this response is admittedly very late, and probably useless in the short run. – I'm surprised you don't seem to have triggered any other responses at all, though!

    In my experience, both for shortish hikes and for multi-day pilgrimages and expeditions, Mountain Hardwear's Elkommando is my absolute preference for any serious walking. It's lightweight, weather-resistant (and can be re-treated with Nikwax or equivalent), has a generous wraparound which keeps it decent even in strong winds. Because the fabric is very lightweight, it dries phenomenally quickly and isn't misery even when it's wet.

    I have two, one at home and one at our holiday place, and I wear them for hiking in all weathers above 0C up into the 30s, from Finland in winter to England all year round and Spain in autumn. I've also used one as an underkilt in Finnish subzero C temperatures, with a heavier kilt atop for warmth, because the Elkommando fabric is very comfortable against the skin.

    I have two criticisms: no hip pockets, and no beltloops – but I've dealt with the beltloop point by taking a narrow strip off the vertical edge of the underapron and fashioning beltloops out of that. There's a cargo pocket on each side, which is big enough to hold an iPad Mini with my electronic maps, for example. The hip pocket issue remains unresolved. (Not everyone would want them, of course, but I do find them useful for a hanky etc.

    Hope your hikes have gone well!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    22nd February 21
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    California
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    Quote Originally Posted by scabd View Post
    and there is more than a few rub points with my backpack
    There's your answer right there. I've been backpacking/mountain climbing for 30 years and trust me, you don't want anything rubbing against your pack, especially with the long distances you are doing. Comfort is everything with long range trips. Wear a proper pair of hiking pants designed for that purpose and save the kilt for day hikes.
    Last edited by SF Jeff; 1st May 21 at 10:00 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    27th July 12
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    Central Coast, New South Wales, Australia
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    The Mountain Hardwear's Elkommando sounds like it would have been ideal. Yes, the selection of material is very important - during my hikes, I was abraded in some interesting places.
    I read that the Elkommando has been discontinued but I noticed that Sports Kilt has what seems to be a comparable product,
    https://sportkilt.com/product-category/Hiking-Kilt/.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    21st October 13
    Location
    Stevenage Herts, UK (& Turku, Finland)
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    Quote Originally Posted by scabd View Post
    The Mountain Hardwear's Elkommando sounds like it would have been ideal. Yes, the selection of material is very important - during my hikes, I was abraded in some interesting places.
    I read that the Elkommando has been discontinued but I noticed that Sports Kilt has what seems to be a comparable product,
    https://sportkilt.com/product-category/Hiking-Kilt/.
    I didn't know that the Elkommando (a stupid name, by the way) had been discontinued. Pity.
    Another excellent utility kilt – less so for hiking, but very good as a standard default in warmer weather – was the 5.11 TDK [Tactical Duty Kilt]. 5.11 are a US company specializing in clothing and gear for men who want to play at pretending to be military, which I have little time for, but the TDK is a good garment: high quality material and workmanship. I have several, and they're my default wear in the British /north European summer.

    5.11 used to make a limited run of them every May, some in camo (of course) but also in quite a range of single colours – black, browns, greens – but not tartans. They would sell out in no time. Then a couple of years ago they decided to discontinue the kilts, and were selling off remainder stock at a good discount. I was able to expand my kilt wardrobe in several colours I like, at nice prices :-)

    I see from the 5.11 website that they now have the camo version back in production, but I don't wear camo, – nor do I wear tartan, since I am not in any way Scottish – I simply find kilts more comfortable than legtubes.

  6. The Following User Says 'Aye' to FinnKilt For This Useful Post:


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