X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website Celtic Croft website
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information Houston Kiltmakers Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    4,047
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Fringing a plaid: to perl or plait?

    I've just finished making a plaid with some of the Old Stewart I recently had woven matched to Wilsons of Bannockburn’s 1819 setting, including a broad selvedge mark. Traditionally, a Day/Laird's plaid is fringed. The most usual method of making the fringe is the perl (twist together) two small bunches of threads which are usualy secured with an overhand know. But, in some early 19th century examples the individual tassels are plaited.

    20201127_134458.jpg

    In this example of double-width cloth there are 96 plaits each end. Allowing for striping out 7 inches of weft threads each end, separating the threads into groups of 8 and then plaiting groups of 3, the the whole process took about 12 hours. I really like the effect.

    20201126_135738sm.jpg 20201126_135842-sm.jpg
    20201126_135948.jpg
    Last edited by figheadair; 27th November 20 at 06:06 AM.

  2. The Following 5 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    17th December 14
    Location
    Windsor, ON, Canada
    Posts
    288
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    I've just finished making a plaid with some of the Old Stewart I recently had woven matched to Wilsons of Bannockburn’s 1819 setting, including a broad selvedge mark. Traditionally, a Day/Laird's plaid is fringed. The most usual method of making the fringe is the perl (twist together) two small bunches of threads which are usualy secured with an overhand know. But, in some early 19th century examples the individual tassels are plaited.



    In this example of double-width cloth there are 96 plaits each end. Allowing for striping out 7 inches of weft threads each end, separating the threads into groups of 8 and then plaiting groups of 3, the the whole process took about 12 hours. I really like the effect.



    Beautifully done. Quite handsome !

  4. #3
    Join Date
    7th February 08
    Location
    Abbotsford, BC, Canada
    Posts
    777
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    “What a difference a day makes” 😉
    ( personally, I wouldn’t have the patience. Did your fingers, or eyes, hurt worse? 😉)
    waulk softly and carry a big schtick

  5. #4
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    4,047
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jhockin View Post
    “What a difference a day makes” 😉
    ( personally, I wouldn’t have the patience. Did your fingers, or eyes, hurt worse? 😉)
    Probably eyes but it was a close run thing.

  6. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0