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  1. #1
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    Scottish Wildcat

    I saw this article (link below) on BBC News this morning and thought folks might be interested in these efforts. I certainly wish the program much success.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland...lands-66322190

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  3. #2
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    Tiny steps on tiny paws, but moving in the right direction. Interesting after all of the earlier discussion of the Scottish Wildcat tartan.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster. Lover of God, dogs, most people, joy, tradition, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Canadian Sinclair.

  4. #3
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    Great article good to see steps to preserve Scotland's endangered species. In my readings on highland wear I saw that in the late 1800's to mid 1900's, Scottish wildcat was a choice for evening wear sporran and sometimes day wear as well. Glad to see that come to an end.

  5. #4
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    Rewilding

    There is an ongoing project to rewild parts of Cumbria. There is an attempt to bring back the golden eagle. The red kite is back to some extent. Work is going on to save the peatland, drainage ditches are being filled with sheep fleece to slow down water loss. I would like to see the wild cats come back to the cat bells. A wild rocky area in the Lake District. The area got its name from the cats that once lived there, they were exterminated eonís ago. But for hundreds of years the area has been open range for Herdwick sheep. I suppose wildcats would do a job on lambs however.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by stickman View Post
    There is an ongoing project to rewild parts of Cumbria. There is an attempt to bring back the golden eagle. The red kite is back to some extent. Work is going on to save the peatland, drainage ditches are being filled with sheep fleece to slow down water loss. I would like to see the wild cats come back to the cat bells. A wild rocky area in the Lake District. The area got its name from the cats that once lived there, they were exterminated eon’s ago. But for hundreds of years the area has been open range for Herdwick sheep. I suppose wildcats would do a job on lambs however.
    The golden Eagle is holding it own in Scotland these days. The red kite is staging a comeback in parts of the UK and is probably one of the most successful re-introduction projects, with the red kite a common sight around Inverness and the Black Isle. In England The red kite is a common sight around Henley on Thames and a wide area surrounding it. My sons tell me that for the first time in living and past historical memory, they have two pairs of Kites nesting on the farm in Gloucestershire. There is also a gallant effort to re-introduce the white tailed sea eagle along the English Channel that is progressing steadily but slowly. Also the sea eagle is now a fairly common sight in the North West of Scotland and the Western Isles these days. And, before anyone mentions it, these re-introductions have not always been met with enthusiasm from some quarters, but I am glad to say with education and experience from those living and working in those areas has begun to allow the projects to slowly begin to thrive.

    As to mammals, the native otter is far more common these days and the reintroduction of the beaver is just starting to show signs of success in places. The wild cat? The biggest problem there is the domestic cat! They unfortunately interbreed with each other readily, which waters down the wildcat genes. So much so, I am not at all sure that a purebred wildcat even exists these days. However there are those who believe there are purebred wildcats about and are trying to preserve them. I hope they are right and I wish them luck. I have in the past been lucky enough to occasionally see these magnificent animals in the wild and frankly I really don't think a healthy lamb is in any danger from a genuine wild cat.

    Was the wild cat ever a presence in the Lake District? I don't know, but the terrain would probably be big enough for a reintroduction of a few pairs. Although the large numbers of domestic cats within and surrounding the Lake District will handicap proceedings more than somewhat.

    Time will tell.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 13th August 23 at 05:56 AM. Reason: found my glasses.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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  8. #6
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    The other 'wild cat' that there is some serious consideration to reintroducing is the Eurasian Lynx. In fact, there is evidence that some may already be here due to illegal release, a bit like the beavers in many parts. In due course, we will probably need something like this, of culling, to control the beaver numbers.

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  10. #7
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    I donít know how big the wild cats are. I was relating it to the bobcat. If itís only as big as a feral domestic cat then I agree that lambs would be safe. However the release of some things may do more harm than good. I read an article in Cumbria Life about the infestation of American crayfish. Seems like someone released some. Without natural predators they have spread all over. People need to learn how to cook and eat them. I suppose that will take some time. The same will happen with beavers. I had a 79 acre farm and thanks to beavers I could not get to 30 acres. I believe in an ideal natural environment there must be predators to keep things in balance.

  11. #8
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    Oh don’t mention those wretched American crayfish they have taken over down South! We have been hosting those for years!
    I am not sure how far they have traveled North though. They are indeed very good to eat!

    The other troublesome American invader is the North American grey squirrel. They have decimated our native red squirrel, mainly through a disease they carry and being more aggressive than the red. Although in this part of the world the greys are no match for the pine marten. Apparently our red squirrel can climb out further on a branch than a grey squirrel and is easy meat for the pine marten and the red squirrel is safe from both.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 13th August 23 at 07:48 AM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  12. #9
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    Those gray squirrels are good to eat also. They donít stand a chance at my place once the season opens. Once you get the hang of skinning them they are good to eat. I used to look forward to squirrel season. A friend and I had a thing about who could get a limit of 10. We would each take 10 .22 shells and more often than not we each got a limit. But that was long ago, I can still shoot just canít get around anymore.

  13. #10
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    When I was much much younger I used to shoot groundhogs, with some friends. If you didnít hit them in the head it cost you a beer. I shot one at 460 paces grazed his chin and went through his neck. Cost me a beer. But cats in the Woods were history if we saw them. It is unbelievable the amount of wildlife they kill. I have seen one take a rabbit. The number of birds and other wildlife they kill is phenomenal. I used to have some large lizards in my yard but the neighbors cat killed them off. The last straw was was when his cat started peeing on my front door. I finally told him if his cat came in my yard again it would be the last time. Never did see it again.

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