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  1. #11
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troglodyte View Post
    You're dead right about the colours - or lack of them.

    Where did this fashion for dull greys and browns come from, I wonder.
    I think the culprit was DC Dalgliesh.

    Here it is in his own words:





    The tartans Dalgliesh introduced in the late 1940s, which they called "reproduction" colours, had these substitutions

    Green > brown
    Blue > grey
    Black > (unchanged)
    Scarlet > dull claret-red

    At some point this entire colour-scheme was adopted by Lochcarron, who re-named it "weathered" colours.

    Though not using reproduction/weathered tartans, and not depicting "ancient" Highlanders, chronologically the next appearance of brown tartans was probably Tunes of Glory (1960).

    It was a strange choice due to none of the Scottish Highland regiments wearing a tartan remotely like that.



    As for Hollywood using the reproduction/weathered colour scheme for "ancient" Highlanders, it might have started with Rob Roy (1995, top right).

    It continues to this day with the current and hugely popular Outlander (2014-present, bottom right).

    Here are Hollywood "ancient Highlanders" compared to actual old portraits.

    BTW it's my theory that the costume designer saw some old images of Highlanders with belted plaids, and other images showing small kilts with long plaids wrapped around the body, and not realising that these were two distinct forms of dress, conflated the two, creating the bizarre thing Liam Neeson can be seen wearing.

    As we see in Outlander, Hollywood costumers insist on a strip of tartan going diagonally across the chest even when a belted plaid is clearly intended.

    Last edited by OC Richard; Yesterday at 11:07 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    6th May 21
    Location
    Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I can't find static images online that show enough detail, but it looks like many of the kilted actors in Brigadoon are wearing some sort of leggings that don't enclose the foot. Basically like MoD "hose tops".

    It sure looks like they have bare ankles above their shoes. (Specifically the man in the red shirt in the middle of this photo, as well as the one on the left with the red kilt.)

    I think it's important to remember the balance that must be struck by costuming between being as authentic as possible while also maintaining practical dress. As Brigadoon is a musical from a particular theatrical tradition, the clothing would need to be made first and foremost for ease of movement and comfort for dancing, then for visual effect--puffy sleeves and flowy collars, while not authentic, increase the effect of every upper body movement, which is critical in *stage production--then for whatever authenticity can be maintained subordinate to the first two priorities. Footless leggings are a compromise that makes sense here, as the ensemble characters are all wearing soft dance shoes, which would not accommodate authentic Highland hose or stirrup-style trews.

    *yes, Brigadoon is a film, but it is done in the classic theatrical style
    Last edited by JPS; Yesterday at 08:03 AM.

  4. #13
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPS View Post
    Brigadoon is a film, but it is done in the classic theatrical style.
    Yes it was an extremely popular musical debuting on Broadway in 1947 (running for over 500 performances, followed by a North American tour) and London's West End in 1949 (over 600 performances).

    We pipers always end up doing Brigadoon runs. There are a number of pieces in the score correctly written for the pipes, and I believe all the 1940s and 1950s companies included a pair of pipers.

    I performed one run of Brigadoon where the decision was made to use correct Scottish dancing throughout. A man qualified as both a Highland Dance and RSCDS instructor was hired to choreograph the dance numbers.

    A Scottish fiddler (Scottish born and raised) played for the social dance numbers, I played for the Sword Dance number and of course the "funeral piobaireachd" number.
    Last edited by OC Richard; Yesterday at 11:28 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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